You are now entering the world of my thoughts.

This blog is my diary of works in progress. The only way a writer can improve upon her skill is to practice, practice and practice some more. Here, in this place of quiet peace, I pen to paper my thoughts and creativity. Welcome to my world.

Copyright © 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013 SN Taylor, All Rights Reserved

Wednesday, April 25, 2012

A-Z Challenge: P is for A Party in Ramadan



Title: A Party in Ramadan


Author: Asma Mobin-Uddin


Illustrator: Laura Jacobsen


Publisher: Boyds Mills Press; April 1, 2009


Ages: 7 - 9


Topics/Themes: Ramadan, birthday party, religious holidays, Muslim culture, choices, tolerance, friendship


Opening
Leena twirled around in front of the kitchen table, breathless and excited as her mother pulled out an invitation from the large envelope. "Mom, Julia is going to have a pony at the party, and we get to ride it!" 


Book Summary:
Ramadan is coming and Leena is excited. Although she is too young to fast each day during the Muslim holy month, she decides to fast on a Friday that her aunt will be visiting. Now Leena has a dilemma. She receives an invitation to a party which happens to fall on that same Friday. Leena doesn’t want to miss the party, but she doesn’t want to miss fasting either.


Resources
Lots of activities and lessons about Ramadan. DLTK has an arts and craft section. See if you can complete the Ramadan Scavenger Hunt.


What I like about the book:


This is another wonderful introduction to Muslim practices and holidays. Leena, like most Muslim children, wants to fast but is conflicted when the day she chooses to fast falls on the same day as a long awaited birthday party. Leena is given the option to fast if she wants or just pick another day. For children who are not required it is so important for parents to be understanding and to allow them to make some choices on their own and respect their choices. Children often learn by example and experience. Her mother could have told her no, that it would be impolite to go to the party and not eat especially since the neighbors did not know anything about fasting or Ramadan. She could have told her that she would be much too hungry and thirsty due to all the running and playing she'd do at the party. But she allowed Leena the chance to experience it all for herself. Leena was even rewarded with a very thoughtful gesture on her friend's part. I loved how Leena's friend offers to stay back with her when it is time to eat cake. Sometimes, children show more kindness and tolerance  than we actually give them credit for. At the end of the book there is an explanation about Ramadan and it's importance to Muslims and the Muslim women's headdress, the Hijab. 

Tuesday, April 24, 2012

A-Z Challenge: O is for One Hen


Title: One Hen

Author: Katie Smith Milway

Illustrator: Eugenie Fernandes

Publisher: Kids Can Press: February 1, 2008

Suitable for: 8 and up

Themes/Topics: africa, microfinancing, community building,

Opening:
Kojo tugs the knot tight and hoists a bundle of firewood onto his head. Since his father died, he has had to quit school and help his mother collect wood to sell at the market.

Book Summary:
Inspired by true events, One Hen tells the story of Kojo, a boy from Ghana who turns a small loan into a thriving farm and a livelihood for many. After his father died, Kojo had to quit school to help his mother collect firewood to sell at the market. When his mother receives a loan from some village families, she gives a little money to her son. With this tiny loan, Kojo buys a hen. A year later, Kojo has built up a flock of 25 hens. With his earnings Kojo is able to return to school. Soon Kojo's farm grows to become the largest in the region.

Links to resources:
EconEdlink is an excellent site with lots of activities. 
Visit One Hen Microfinance for Kids for more information about the organization, the book and lots of activities and lesson plans (click on the Teachers and Librarians tab).

Why I like this book:
Books based on true stories, lives and events always touch my heart. This one is no different. There is so much we can learn from the lives of others. From the beginning I just fell in love with the character Kojo. One Hen shows what happens when a little help makes a big difference. Children are introduced to the concept of microloans and finances, a lending system for people in developing countries who have no collateral and no access to conventional banking. Microloans have begun to receive more media attention in recent years. In 2006 Muhammad Yunus, a Bangledeshi economist who pioneered microloan banking, won the Nobel Peace Prize.The final pages of One Hen explain the microloan system and include a list of relevant organizations for children to explore.

A-Z Challenge: N is for.... No Mirrors in My Nana's House


Title: No Mirrors in My Nana’s House

Author: Ysaye M. Barnwell

Illustrator: Synthia Saint James

Publisher:  Houghton Mifflin Harcourt April 1, 2005

Suitable for: 4 - 7

Themes/Topics: Self-perception, Grandmothers, African-Americans, Cultural and Socio-Economical heritage

Opening: 
There were no mirrors in my Nana’s house
No mirrors in my Nana’s house.
So the beauty that I saw in everything was in her eyes……

Book Summary:
A little girl discovers the beauty in herself—and the beauty of the world around her—not by looking in the mirror but by looking in her Nana's eyes.

Links to resources: 
Most of the resource I found were actually documents and powerpoint presentations that downloaded directly to my computer but I did find a few really good ones that encourage lots of discussion on cultural diversity and identity. Art and Discussion topics. Lesson on cultural differences.
Listen to the story online with Tia and Tamara and find more activities.

Why I like this book:
What a wonderfully written book! I love the story of a child who lives and learns about the beauty of life and the appreciation of the life she has through the love and compassion of her Nana. Despite growing up in an unprivileged environment, she learns that there is beauty in everything around her, all through the eyes of her Nana. She did not grow up to judge her self based on what others looked like or had. The illustrations are done in acrylic paints on canvas and they are amazing! I love the concept of no facial features in the illustrations. I was still able to feel the emotions of each word even though their faces did not show it. This book would be suitable for Muslim families who do not approve of illustrations of human or living beings.

Phyllis in Seattle!

I had the wonderful opportunity to host a lovable, cute and world renowned groundhog name Phyllis Punxsutawney (hehehe, say that three times really fast!) Phyllis stopped by on her world tour to visit my toddler classroom. 


 Phyllis arrived on the 19th in the evening. I picked her up after I got off of work. She was tired and it was raining so we went straight home where she was greeted by a very frequent house guest, A-Wall, my niece's cat.
 I think he had a real crush on her because............
 ...... he would not leave her side! Phyllis was nice enough to chat and chill out with A-Wall before going to bed. 
 The next morning, more rain! Sorry Phyllis but Welcome to Seattle! But she was enthusiastic and even excited about visiting my job and meeting a bunch of lively one year olds. :)
 Phyllis met with the local animals. They talked about Seattle weather and Phyllis's travels. They were a little jealous but enjoyed her company and stories from around the world.
Circle time with Phyllis! This is my co-teacher Jessie who did the honors of reading with Phyllis to the kids who, surprised us all, sat through most of the story :D They loved looking at the pictures and touching the pages. :D
After circle Phyllis joined in the classroom ruckus of a young toddler classroom. She visited the sensory table, played with blocks, played hide 'n' seek and went on a color parade through our center with the little ones.  
  
 Phyllis was rather pooped from all the fun with the little ones, after lunch (she is really great with kids :D) she was able to take a nap while the little ones slept.
 Phyllis was happy to spot the Space Needle even though we did not have time to go. But I promised the next time she visits, we will take her.
 I thought the day at the childcare center would have wiped her out but Phyllis had other plans!
 Phyllis and my oldest brother Na'eem :)
 A-Wall was so happy to see Phyllis again. Love at first and second sight! :D
 Phyllis got to meet my niece and A-Wall's brother, Cali-Fat. Cali-Fat was very intrigued as was my niece. She really did not want me to send Phyllis off on the next stop of her world tour. 

Description and Describing


Have you ever had a hard time describing something to someone and they just did not get it?
I went to the dentist today. Normally I would ask to be sedated, I am not really all that good with pain, but for some reason the dates got mixed up and the receptionist scheduled me in the middle of the week instead of on a Friday when my dentist does her sedation appointments. So we had to reschedule. But my tooth was really bothering me so I asked her if I could keep the date and try it out without sedation. My dentist applauded my bravery (lol) and said yes. She suggested instead I get nitrous oxide. So, I got seated and the assistant put a thing over my nose so I could take in oxygen first then the nitrous oxide. She kept asking me, how do you feel, is the nitrous oxide working? I inhaled (deeply.) I honestly did not know if the stuff was working or not. I did not feel any different. 

Finally I had to ask her, "How am I suppose to feel?" She answered, "Well most people describe it as the feeling you get when you drink alcohol." I thought to myself, "Well that doesn't help much, I have never had alcohol in my life so I have no idea what that feels like!" So I told her. She tried again and said, "well, you should feel like you are floating." Now, the only people I associate with "floating" experiences are those who take drugs (my mom was a social worker), and I have never done drugs in my life. I have never even smoked a cigarette. So, needless to say, I did not feel like I was floating. So she turned the gas up a notch and I inhaled even deeper. A few minutes later, nothing but I was beginning to feel a little relaxed and not uptight about being in the dentist chair. Not to mention, I was listening to some really nice and relaxing music with ocean sounds and Native America flute. But I was still not sure if I was reaching this "nirvana" state that she was trying to describe. So up the gas went. Finally, something was happening. I was getting really sleepy.  My dentist came in and asked me how I was doing. I managed to open my eyes and with a half cocked smile nodded and I think I said I was doing fine. She laughed and said, "You are liking that nitrous oxide." 

So back to description and describing. It is important to have a diverse vocabulary to be able to describe an emotion, feeling, action or scene to a person(s) who may or may not have your experiences. As the assistant tried to find ways to describe the affects of nitrous oxide on people, she did not take into consideration that maybe some one like me, a Muslim, has never had alcohol before and thus does not know what it feels like to be drunk, loopy or 'floating'. Now, had she asked me if I had ever gotten a  massage before, then I would have grinned and told her to crank the gas up. :D 

So in the end I learned that nitrous oxide helps relax you, takes the edge off of your anxieties and release a lot of tension. Maybe some people do feel like they are floating but I felt relaxed enough to actually say I was sleepy but awake enough to hear everything going on around me. 

Have you ever experienced a word, emotion, feeling or scene in your writing that you could not describe or had a hard time describing?

Saturday, April 21, 2012

Perfect Picture Book: Super Blake

Title: Super Blake and the Cavity Monster


Author: Tracy Bickhaus


Illustrator: Korey Scott


Publisher: Brickhouse Media LLC; March 1, 2011


Theme/Topics: Dental hygiene, Super Hero, Good Character


Ages: 3 and up


Opening
There once was a little boy named Blake. Every morning at 6 he would wake.


Book Summary: 
Super Blake Books are a series of children's picture books that follow Super Blake through a variety of adventures. He shows kids how they can be a hero in everyday life by making good choices and helping others. In this first book of the series, Super Blake battles tooth decay in the form of The Cavity Monster and his evil sidekicks: Ginger Vitis and Sir Plaque.


Resources: Find Super Blake, Cavity Monster, Ginger Vitis and Sir Plaque coloring pages, word search, printable bookmarks and more. Learn about healthy dental practices here. Online games and activities for ages ranging from 2-9.


Why I like the book: 
This is a nice book that focuses on making good choices. Blake teaches children what an everyday hero should be like. Healthy teeth is encouraged through fighting off the mean cavity monster by promoting brushing and flossing. It is a rhyming book so young children will like it and follow along with the beat and rhythm. the illustrations are really cute and bright. Blake is such a cute character. The author spent a little time in the beginning of the story introducing Blake then moved on to the story of fighting tooth decay. At first I did not care for all the long wait, but as this is a series about making good choices, I do see the need for the reader to really get to know Blake. I also love all the goodies on the author's website from bookmarks to certificates, stickers, coloring pages and lots more. 


For a complete list of Perfect Picture Books visit Susanna L Hill's blog. 

Thursday, April 19, 2012

A-Z Challenge: M is for My Mother's Garden


Title: My Mother’s Garden

Author: Emila Yusof

Illustrator: Emila Yusof

Publisher: One Red Flower Press; March 30, 2010

Suitable for: 3 and up

Themes/Topics: Tropical Flowers, Insects, Gardens, 
Culture/Malaysia

Opening: I love playing in my mother’s garden.

Book Summary:

Follow a young girl as she explores her mother's garden with her furry friend. My Mother's Garden, is a wonderful book filled with flowers, bees, dragonflies and butterflies. Children are introduced to the names of some Malaysian tropical flowers and plants which are listed in their scientific and English common names at the back of the book. An ideal book for reading aloud and for playing 'I spy' in the outdoors as the child learns to recognize plants featured in the book!

Links to resources:

Check out the world fact book for information about Malaysia here. This link has information about ginger plants. Find more native flowers of Malaysia here. Here are some coloring pages for a fun quiet activity. Hibiscus coloring page here and here. Have a try at these fun trivia questions here.

Why I like this book:

I loved playing in my grandmother’s garden as a little, little girl and later in my mom’s when I got a bit older. My grandmother loved to plant flowers especially roses while my mom had a vegetable garden. In “My Mother’s Garden” we follow a young Malaysian girl as she explores her mother’s exotic garden with her pet cat. You wont find your average garden variety in this garden! Much more exotic plants await to delight young children like hibiscus, ginger, frangipani and ixora. Also at the end of the book children get to learn more about the plants that are featured in the story that includes their scientific, common and Malay names.

A-Z Challenge: L is for The Librarian of Basra

Title: The Librarian of Basra

Author: Jeanette Winter

Illustrator: Jeanette Winter

Publisher: Harcourt Children’s Books; January 1, 2005

Suitable for: 4 and up

Themes/Topics: Middle East/ Iraq, Library, Bravery, Non-fiction,

Opening:
“In the Koran, the first thing God said to Muhammad was ‘Read.’”

Book Summary:
Alia Muhammad Baker is a librarian in Basra, Iraq. For fourteen years, her library has been a meeting place for those who love books. Until now. Now war has come, and Alia fears that the library--along with the thirty thousand books within it--will be destroyed forever.

In a war-stricken country where civilians--especially women--have little power, this true story about a librarian's struggle to save her community's priceless collection of books reminds us all how, throughout the world, the love of literature and the respect for knowledge know no boundaries.

Links to resources:
Find a study guide at teachable moments. 4th grade lesson plan. Learning to Give has another great lesson plan with cross curricular activities. 

Why I like this book:
I love books that show true bravery and fore sight of present day women. This is a wonderful book for girls (and boys) to read and feel inspired to stand up and act for what they believe is right and for the good the community even if their action is something small. The fact that this is a true story makes it even more touching. The author does not use a bunch of words to describe what is going on. She does a great job relaying the facts about what is happening with out making it too scary or gory (as war can be very gory) We see the what and why the librarian is worried and why and how she rescues her books. The illustrations are simple but relay the message of the story perfectly. Anyone who loves and respects books will love reading this story about a brave woman who courageously protected 30,000 books, some irreplaceable, from a war’s destructive grip.

Wednesday, April 18, 2012

A-Z Challenge: K is for The Keeping Quilt


Title: The Keeping Quilt

Author: Patricia Polacco

Illustrator: Patricia Polacco

Publisher: Aladdin; May 1, 2001

Suitable for: 4 - 8

Themes/Topics: Quilts, Jews, Emigration and Immigration, Family Heirlooms, Family Traditions.

Opening:
When my Great-Gramma Anna came to America, she wore the same thick overcoat and big boots she had worn for farm work. But her family weren’t dirt farmers anymore.

Book Summary:
"We will make a quilt to help us always remember home," Anna's mother said. "It will be like heaving the family in back home Russia dance around us at night."

And so it was. From a basket of old clothes, Anna's babushka, Uncle Vladimir's shirt, Aunt Havalah's nightdress and an apron of Aunt Natasha's become The Keeping Quilt, passed along from mother to daughter for almost a century. For four generations the quilt is a Sabbath tablecloth, a wedding canopy, and a blanket that welcomes babies warmly into the world.

Links to resources:
Carol Hurst has a wonderful list of activities and discussions points on her blog Find a wonderful online quiz here. Find more lesson ideas here

Why I like this book:
Patricia Polacco does an excellent job telling the tale of how her family heirloom, a quilt, was made and its history throughout the generations. It was a very touching story! I loved reading and watching the generations continue the tradition of passing on the quilt and how the marriage custom evolved keeping some of the same traditions but adding others to it. It was so beautiful! I think homemade heirlooms are a really neat way to pass along family traditions and history. Now I want to make a keeping quilt! 

Saturday, April 14, 2012

A-Z Challenge: J is for Jambo means Hello


Title: Jambo Means Hello

Author: Muriel Feelings

Illustrator: Tom Feelings

Publisher: Puffin; July 15, 1992

Topic/Theme: Alphabet, Africa, African Culture, Swahili Language

Ages: 3 and up

Opening: A  arusi is a wedding.

Summary:
Jambo Means Hello is a fun alphabet that introduces basic Swahili vocabulary. The book gives a word in Swahili for each letter in the Swahili alphabet. The Swahili alphabet doesn't have the letters Q or X therefore only has 24 letters. Along with each word is a pronunciation key and a short paragraph telling a little bit about the word and its context in rural African society.

Resources:
Swahili is spoken widely in eastern Africa, can you find and name the countries on this map? Lesson plan that includes a word quilt activity Listen to a Swahili Folktale. Learn about Kenya. Kenyan flag and map coloring page.

Why I like this book:
This is a book I used to read as a kid. I loved it. I memorized every word and considered myself fluent in Swahili! Lol Then when the Lion King came out I was thrilled that I knew a lot of the words. The illustrations are beautiful and reflect the word of the alphabet. Just a note though, the book focuses mostly on African rural and village life and traditions.  Nonetheless, this book is a wonderful introduction to Kenyan culture and language.

A-Z Challenge: I is for I Love My Hair


Title: I Love My Hair

Author: Natasha Anastasia Tarpley

Illustrator: E.B. Lewis

Publisher: Little, Brown Books for Young Readers; February 1, 1998

Topic/Theme: African American Heritage, Hair, Ethnic Identity, Cultural Identity, Heritage Pride

Ages: 4 - 8

Opening:
Every night before I go to bed, Mama combs my hair. I sit between her knees, resting my elbows on her thighs like pillows. 

Summary:
Every night before she goes to bed, Keyana sits down between her mother's knees to have her hair combed. But no matter how gently Mama pulls, it still hurts sometimes! Keyana doesn't feel lucky to have such a head of hair, but Mama says she is because she can wear it any way she chooses. "I can spin your hair into a fine, soft yarn, just like our grandmothers did at their spinning wheels," she tells her. "Or I can part your hair into strait lines and plant rows of braids along your scalp, the way we plant seeds in our garden." Soon Keyana, too, finds reasons to love her hair, and she wears it any way she chooses with pride.

Resources:
Discussion topics: Hair types. Have children describe their hair. Have them use descriptive words. Have children find something unique about their hair. Craft: Create self-portraits concentrating on hair types. Children can use different kinds of material that best matches their hair type, color, length, style and texture such as yarn, string, pipe cleaners, ribbon, cotton, and colored markers.

Why I like this book:

LOL! boy does this book bring back memories! I could see myself (especially my baby sister) in Keyana. Yes, I remember the days when I sat between my mama, grandma, auntie or cousin's knees and got my hair done. I was not as tender headed as my youngest sister who would cry, cry, cry and beg for my mom to use the brush first when she got her hair down but there were times when my hair was a bit nappier than usual and tears fell. But I loved to get my hair done. While I liked getting my hair pressed sometimes, I really liked getting it braided! I tried an afro once but had a heck of a time getting it back under control! :D But I loved my hair. Even today I prefer it natural than straightened (guess I got burned one to many times growing up :D) But this book really focuses on loving yourself. Loving your hair, loving your style and your heritage. We are all beautiful in our own way.

Friday, April 13, 2012

Perfect Picture Book Friday: Since We're Friends: An Autism Picture Book


Title: Since We're Friends: An Autism Picture Book 

Author: Celeste Shally 

Illustrator: David Harrington

Publisher: Awaken Specialty Press, September 1, 2007

Topic/Theme: Autism, Friendship, Acceptance, Special Needs

Ages: 3-8

Opening: It's finally summer vacation! It's going to be perfect because I'm going to hang out with my friend Matt who lives across the street.

Summary: Since We're Friends is about two boys. One has autism, the other does not. The story of their relationship provides practical examples of how to make such a friendship work. It will help children see that their peers with autism can make a fun, genuine contribution to friendship. 

Resources:
What is Autism? Here are ten facts about autism.
KidsHealth is a wonderful site that explains Autism to children using simple language and facts. Autism Speaks is another site with great resources for people with autism including apps. Check out Oliver's Guide to Autism, a very cute and informative way to learn about autism from a young boy name Oliver who has autism.


Why I like this book:
I love this book! I have a sibling with autism. Naeem, my oldest brother, was diagnosed with autism when he was three years of age. I love this book because it helps children and siblings with understanding and learning how to help their friends with autism. It is important however to know that not all children and adults with autism are the same. In the case of my brother Na'eem, he is different from Matt in this story in that he can not and does not like to engage in group activities, he does not engage in conversation with others not even me or my family. He is sometimes able to relay in very simple vocabulary what he needs or wants. This story is very particular to the relationship with Matt and his friend. But the book does give a general idea in how to help and engage a friend with autism. 

YA Blog Tour: Night Sky by Jolene Perry

Today's guest post is from Jolene Perry, author of her latest release, Night Sky. I am participating in her blog tour. 

Who has trouble with getting from point A to point B, otherwise known as the editing process, once you have finished your masterpiece of a manuscript? I know I do. Jolene has been gracious enough to share her editing process for her book, Night Sky! Thank you for visiting with us today Jolene ..... now, take it away!! :) 


Jolene's editing process:
Hold on.
It's an odd ride.

When I FIRST finish a manuscript - I KNOW it's the best one EVER. 
Time is the only thing that can fix this.

Before I actually tell myself I'm finished - I think about these two main things:

1. I make sure that some thread ties everything in together - in Night Sky it was honesty, in Knee Deep it was loyalty.

2. Then I make sure that my character has had some amount of growth - if they'd react the same way in any given situation at the end of the book, as they would have in the beginning, there was no growth.

Editing for me goes like this - 

Step one
Read it aloud - usually my husband gets to listen, and he's great with the logic stuff - she already said that, I thought she left in the last scene...

Step two
Send it to one friend who is NOT a writer, just a reader.

Step three
Let it sit for a month, maybe more.
Read it again, with more objective eyes, and fix/change/tweak.

Step four
Send it to one of my writer friends.
Make corrections, if I don't have to make major changes, I send it to someone else right away. If I DO make major changes, I keep it to myself for another few weeks before looking over it again. THEN make corrections, and send it to someone else.

Then it goes to my agent.

If I'm having trouble - here's a few things I do:

I outline the whole book AFTER I've written it, and put in this info:
I write why the scene is important, the info given or list the connection that's made to the rest of the book in that scene - in other words - WHY THIS SCENE MUST BE HERE
I write what my character wants.
I write what's keeping them from getting it.

I do that through the whole book. It's a pain, but helps with pacing, with cutting non-essential info, and with making sure that I don't have too many scenes in a row that involve the same people or any repetitive information.

And THAT'S the simple version of my editing process. I do have a few books that I know will have to go through more readers than this, but this is my standard. Hope this helps! I love hearing about writing and editing processes, because it nearly always helps me with mine.

Thanks SO much for having me here today!

~ Jolene
Find out more about the author and her book, The Night Sky

Night Sky website.
Jolene Perry's Website.
Tribute Books website.
Tribute Books Blog Tours Facebook.

Wednesday, April 11, 2012

Autism Awareness Giveaway Hop April 11th - 17th


April is Autism Awareness Month.  To help spread the word about Autism we are hosting a giveaway hop.

What is Autism? Here are ten facts about autism.

KidsHealth is a wonderful site that explains Autism to children using simple language and facts. Autism Speaks is another site with great resources for people with autism including apps. Check out Oliver's Guide to Autism, a very cute and informative way to learn about autism from a young boy name Oliver who has autism.

Book Giveaway!

Title: Since We're Friends: An Autism Picture Book 
Author: Celeste Shally 
Illustrator: David Harrington
Publisher: Awaken Specialty Press, September 1, 2007
Topic/Theme: Autism, Friendship, Acceptance, Special Needs
Ages: 3-8
Opening: It's finally summer vacation! It's going to be perfect because I'm going to hang out with my friend Matt who lives across the street.

Summary: Since We're Friends is about two boys. One has autism, the other does not. The story of their relationship provides practical examples of how to make such a friendship work. It will help children see that their peers with autism can make a fun, genuine contribution to friendship. 

Resources
See links above.

Why I like this book:
I love this book! I have a sibling with autism. Naeem, my oldest brother, was diagnosed with autism when he was three years of age. I love this book because it helps children and siblings with understanding and learning how to help their friends with autism. It is important however to know that not all children and adults with autism are the same. In the case of my brother Na'eem, he is different from Matt in this story in that he can not and does not like to engage in group activities, he does not engage in conversation with others not even me or my family. He is sometimes able to relay in very simple vocabulary what he needs or wants. This story is very particular to the relationship with Matt and his friend. But the book does give a general idea in how to help and engage a friend with autism. 


Remember, this is a blog hop. So hop along to the various blogs for more books and giveaways! 

Member of the Society of Children's Book Writers and Illustrators